Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is an award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR's newscast unit, APM's Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. 

For more frequent updates from Richmond, or occasional commentary on rock climbing and vegetable gardening, you can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

 

 

Richmond City Council met Monday night to discuss a proposed bump to the city’s meals tax. The Mayor is calling for the tax increase as a way to raise money for Richmond’s crumbling schools and local restaurant owners are pushing back.

Richmond, though, isn’t the first locality in Virginia to turn to the meals tax for education.

St

As one of his first moves as the new Speaker of Virginia’s House of Delegates, Republican Kirk Cox granted paid family leave to employees of the House. At the same time, the broader push for paid leave is making limited headway.

AP Photo / Steve Helber

Republicans in Richmond have opened the door to negotiations on Medicaid expansion, and they say they want recipients to work. But work requirements aren’t the only reforms that could be part of an expansion deal.

Creative Commons / Flickr

In Virginia, Republican leaders are now saying they won’t talk Medicaid expansion unless Democrats support work requirements for the program. A bill to do just that made its way through a key committee this week.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

This year marks 50 years since Congress passed the Fair Housing Act. The law made it possible for people of color to buy homes in any neighborhood they wanted. Before the law, neighborhoods often had covenants restricting sales to white families.

Pages