Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is an award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR's newscast unit, APM's Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. 

For more frequent updates from Richmond, or occasional commentary on rock climbing and vegetable gardening, you can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

Steve Helber / AP

 

 

The chances for Medicaid expansion in Virginia crept up Thursday when a key Republican lawmaker from Southwest Virginia announced his support for the plan.

 

Terry Kilgore is a prominent conservative in Virginia politics.  Speaking on the John Fredericks Show, he says he now supports expanding the health insurance program for the poor, known as  Medicaid, if Virginia includes work requirements.

Steve Helber / AP

Heading into this year’s General Assembly Republicans had been battered at the polls. They were clinging to a single-vote majority that they won by by the luck of the draw. Now, one month in, Republican Speaker of the House Kirk Cox is upbeat.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIOIQ

There’s a push to get students excited about computer science and tech. A new public high school in Richmond is tapping into that trend. But the school, called CodeRVA, isn’t just relying on innovative curriculum. It’s also an entirely different model of teaching, where school is a workplace.

flightlog/Flickr CC

 

Anyone who has driven on Virginia’s interstates knows you have to be ready to share the road with trucks. But some are now pushing for those trucks to get even larger.

Sara D. Davis / AP

 

 

Children who are born deaf or hard of hearing often wind up in kindergarten with no formal language. The state wants to find out why and what can be done, but there’s disagreement over the best approach.

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