Fred Echols

WVTF/RADIO IQ News Host, Producer and Reporter

Fred Echols is a long time member of the WVTF/RADIO IQ news department and produces news content as well as public affairs programs. Fred's career in broadcasting began in North Carolina's Triad before switching from commercial radio where he'd held numerous positions including program director to hosting public radio programming at WVTF.

 

Virginia Public Access Project

A Supreme Court ruling that says signs cannot be treated differently based on content no longer allows local governments to give political signs extra leeway. That's caused some inconvenience for a Virginia county. And, not everyone is happy that Mary Baldwin University in Staunton will soon have male students living on campus for the first time. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's Va News link at vpap.org.

Virginia Public Access Project

300 hunters from across the Eastern United States spent a recent weekend shooting predatory animals in hope of winning a cash prize offered in Virginia, and the latest oversized Confederate flag to go up in the state has been ruled illegal. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's Va News link at vpap.org.

Virginia Public Access Project

When a southwest Virginia man considered himself inconvenienced by the DMV he decided to pay his car tax the hard way, and charges have been dropped against a Prince William teenager accused of stealing a carton of milk at school. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's Va News link at vpap.org.

Virginia Public Access Project

Since Chesterfield County supervisors made it cheaper for developers to launch new projects they've been overwhelmed with applications, and as flooding gets worse in Hampton Roads there's a call for a new state cabinet position to manage response efforts. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's Va News link at vpap.org.

Virginia Public Access Project

City council members in Chesapeake have decided they need stronger laws to deal with night clubs where things get out of hand, and Surry County is finding out how hard it can be to keep 400-year-old paperwork in good condition. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's Va News link at vpap.org.

Pages