Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Backing a lower court's decision that extends a grace period for people displaced by a huge natural gas leak, an appeals court says Southern California Gas Co. should pay for temporary housing for an additional 30 days, rather than the eight-day period the company had planned.

On the heels of new U.N. sanctions that could crimp its economic dealings with China, North Korea has fired six projectiles — possibly rockets or missiles — into the sea on the country's eastern coast, South Korean officials say.

The projectiles that were fired Thursday flew for at least 60 miles before hitting the water, according to media reports in South Korea.

From Seoul, NPR's Elise Hu reports:

Announcing what it calls "the first cyber bug bounty program in the history of the federal government," the Department of Defense says it's inviting hackers to test the security of its Web pages and networks.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are the big winners the morning after Super Tuesday, each of them taking seven of the 13 states in play and adding to their leads.

On a day with the largest delegate total of this election season, Trump now has 285 delegates to 161 for Ted Cruz and 87 for Marco Rubio. In the Democratic race, Clinton has now won 543 delegates to Sanders' 349. When superdelegates are added to the tally, her lead grows to 1,000-371.

Here are five headlines that describe where we are in the race right now:

Los Angeles police officers used some type of force nearly 2,000 times last year, according to a new internal report. Officers shot 38 people — killing 21 of them — and more than a third of those shot had an indication of mental illness, the LAPD says.

In the five-year period from 2011 through 2015, LAPD officers shot 52 black suspects, according to the report — meaning that in a city where 9 percent of the population is black, nearly 30 percent of those shot by police were black.