Anne Marie Morgan

Richmond Bureau Chief, Virginia Public Radio

Anne Marie Morgan whose reporting can regularly be heard on our Morning Edition and All Things Considered state and regional newscasts is one of the most experienced State Capitol broadcast journalists in Virginia.

In addition to providing content to Virginia Public Radio member stations, Anne Marie has also worked as an anchor and Capitol Reporter for the Virginia News Network.

She previously worked as State Capitol Reporter for WTVR-TV, WRIC-TV, and Virginia-PBS Television, where she hosted and co-produced a variety of television programs, including Capitol Views and Virginia Legislature: The Week. She also reported Virginia news for two national networks, USA Radio News and International Media Service News.

To reach Anne Marie, please contact our newsroom.

The practice of “streeting”—or releasing people with mental illnesses when psychiatric beds are not found for them—came to light in 2013 when that happened to Senator Creigh Deeds’ son, who later took his own life.  But changes in civil commitment laws to reform the state’s crisis response system were subsequently approved and took effect last July.  State officials have unveiled new statistics that reveal the effects of those reforms.

Elementary and middle school students who fail Standards of Learning tests by narrow margins will have an opportunity to retake those tests this spring thanks to new regulations passed by the State Board of Education. The rules stem from a law that sailed through the General Assembly—but would not have taken effect until July 1st if the Board had not acted.  

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State officials are looking to local school divisions to develop some world-class, in-the-field ideas to reform education.  Following an application process, the state will award five school superintendents with $50,000 each for grants to craft innovative plans for their districts.  Superintendents are being asked to “dream big”—and contemplate how they would run their schools with complete flexibility for two years. 

Virginia is creating a new Center for Behavioral Health and Justice under an executive directive signed by Governor McAuliffe.  Its mission is to foster better interagency collaboration and help coordinate services in the state’s behavioral health system. The focus will be on individuals with mental illness who become involved with the criminal justice system.

One recently approved bill that’s still under review by Governor McAuliffe arose from the case of murdered UVa student Hannah Graham—and was championed by Albemarle County Sheriff Chip Harding.  The bill would require collection of DNA from people convicted of certain misdemeanors….with their DNA added to the state’s criminal database.   The governor had raised some objections to the legislation while the General Assembly was still in session.

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