Anne Marie Morgan

Richmond Bureau Chief, Virginia Public Radio

Anne Marie Morgan whose reporting can regularly be heard on our Morning Edition and All Things Considered state and regional newscasts is one of the most experienced State Capitol broadcast journalists in Virginia.

In addition to providing content to Virginia Public Radio member stations, Anne Marie has also worked as an anchor and Capitol Reporter for the Virginia News Network.

She previously worked as State Capitol Reporter for WTVR-TV, WRIC-TV, and Virginia-PBS Television, where she hosted and co-produced a variety of television programs, including Capitol Views and Virginia Legislature: The Week. She also reported Virginia news for two national networks, USA Radio News and International Media Service News.

To reach Anne Marie, please contact our newsroom.

The panel created by Governor McAuliffe to recommend changes to state ethics laws is tackling an issue that’s not typically associated with conflicts of interest:  the way that Virginia chooses judges.  

The Governor's Commission on Integrity and Public Confidence in State Government says the quality of the state’s judiciary overall is excellent.


A little-known state program that assists lower-income students with college scholarships is ending its five-year pilot and is poised for permanent expansion. SOAR Virginia is an early commitment scholarship program created by the Virginia 529 College Savings Plan. Its goal is to inspire high school students and help them pursue higher education.

Federal legislation to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 has come under fire from Virginia’s Legislative Black Caucus and a coalition of national and state civil rights organizations.  

The groups assert that both the U.S. House and Senate versions of the reauthorization fail to adequately protect vulnerable student populations.

While state lawmakers spent a great deal of time this year on serious ethics, education, and public safety challenges, some other issues also merited the General Assembly’s attention. One topic that did not grab many headlines, though: food.

When mobile food-vendors were being told to remove their trucks from state highway rights-of-way, Delegate Eileen Filler-Corn conducted an investigation.  She said no one knows why the policy was enacted in the first place, but it was stifling entrepreneurs and innovation. 

Anne Marie Morgan

A wide array of new state laws take effect July 1st, and among them are a statute that will ultimately extend health insurance coverage to many more children with autism spectrum disorder.  The mandatory benefit covers diagnosis and treatment—and applies to ALL insurers except plans offered by self-insured companies and smaller businesses.

Lawmakers added a mandated insurance benefit for autism spectrum disorder in 2011. But the new law’s sponsor, Delegate Tag Greason, says that only covers children who are ages two through six.