Anne Marie Morgan

Richmond Bureau Chief, Virginia Public Radio

Anne Marie Morgan whose reporting can regularly be heard on our Morning Edition and All Things Considered state and regional newscasts is one of the most experienced State Capitol broadcast journalists in Virginia.

In addition to providing content to Virginia Public Radio member stations, Anne Marie has also worked as an anchor and Capitol Reporter for the Virginia News Network.

She previously worked as State Capitol Reporter for WTVR-TV, WRIC-TV, and Virginia-PBS Television, where she hosted and co-produced a variety of television programs, including Capitol Views and Virginia Legislature: The Week. She also reported Virginia news for two national networks, USA Radio News and International Media Service News.

To reach Anne Marie, please contact our newsroom.

Creative Commons

A two-day teacher institute at the Library of Virginia has provided educators with the opportunity to advance their knowledge about the post-Civil War era-especially how the Commonwealth was transformed by the emancipation of slaves and Reconstruction. One major focus was on the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution-and their significant legacy. 

The “Reconstruction Amendments” sought to eliminate vestiges of the defeated system. The Library’s Public Services and Outreach Director, Greg Kimball, says that began with the 13th Amendment to outlaw slavery.

To Be Sold

Aug 7, 2015
Library of Virginia, 1812

The Library of Virginia is preparing for a groundbreaking exhibition on the U.S. domestic slave trade that existed after the newly formed American nation outlawed the transatlantic slave trade. 

Richmond was a key player in the pipeline to buy and sell human beings, and some historians believe it sent more slaves to the Deep South than were initially transported across the Atlantic Ocean. 

The “To Be Sold” exhibition begins with the paintings of an English artist who was horrified by what he saw during a visit to Richmond.

Kaiser Health News

The Joint Commission on Health Care is tackling an issue that the members say is much more complex than it may first appear:  whether minors may voluntarily consent to inpatient psychiatric treatment WITHOUT the permission of their parents or guardians. With an estimated 930 minors impacted by this dilemma each year, the commission says the problem needs to be addressed.

Business executives from the high-tech sector hosted an event at the State Capitol to share research and information, as well as network with government officials.  Governor McAuliffe called on the members of the Government Business Executive Forum to help Virginia pivot from the nation’s top state for defense spending to the leading state for information technology.

The panel created by Governor McAuliffe to recommend changes to state ethics laws is tackling an issue that’s not typically associated with conflicts of interest:  the way that Virginia chooses judges.  

The Governor's Commission on Integrity and Public Confidence in State Government says the quality of the state’s judiciary overall is excellent.