NPR News

World leaders are scheduled to meet in Paris soon, trying to draft an agreement on how to combat climate change. Among the heads of state, you'll also see California Gov. Jerry Brown, who is spearheading his own international climate movement.

Brown has been on an international diplomatic tour the last few months — all about climate change.

"The world faces an existential threat," he told Canadian leaders in July.

Then, he went to the Vatican. "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap," he said.

If egg freezing once sounded like science fiction, those days are over. Women now hear about it from their friends, their doctors and informational events like Wine and Freeze.

Shady Grove Fertility Center in the Washington, D.C., area hosts Wine and Freeze nights for prospective patients every few months. Fifteen or so women in their 30s gathered at one recently over wine, brownies and sticky buns. A doctor explained the procedure, the costs and the odds of frozen eggs resulting in a baby — which decline as a woman ages.

After a long stalemate, a bipartisan team of congressional negotiators has agreed to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The law, currently known as No Child Left Behind, sends roughly $14 billion a year to schools that serve mostly low-income students.

Here's what we know about the rough agreement. First, annual testing — a major feature of NCLB — would remain for grades three through eight and at least once in high school. Schools would still have to test 95 percent of their students and report the results by race, income and special need.

Remember that health class you had in middle school? Where you found out all that stuff about your body? We wondered why there wasn't a class like that for middle age. Could someone tell us what happens to us as we move through the decades?

Morning Edition asked listeners to send their questions about women's bodies and aging as part of our ongoing series Changing Lives of Women. We heard from hundreds of you asking about everything from sleeplessness to STDs to sex in old age.

Yves Herman/Reuters

Belgium has had a reputation for many things. Chocolate. Beer. French fries with mayonaisse.

But a hotbed for jihadist activity? 

Two of the terrorists involved in the November 13 Paris attacks were identified as French citizens from the Brussels neighborhood of Molenbeek. That district has also been linked to two other major Islamic teror attacks: The rampage at the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine offices and a plot against a train from Paris to Belgium.

What is it about Belgium? How did it get on this particular map?