Lizzie Skurnick's reviews and essays have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and "many other appallingly underpaying publications," she says. Her books blog, Old Hag, is a Forbes Best of the Web pick and has been anthologized in Vintage's Ultimate Blogs: Masterworks from the Wild Web. She writes a column on vintage young-adult fiction for Jezebel.com, a job she has been preparing for her entire life. She is on the board of the National Book Critics Circle.

Government & Politics
4:09 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Virginia Adopts: Campaign for 1000

Several national publications rank Virginia within the top five for raising a child or providing a decent education but when it comes to finding an orphaned child a permanent home before they turn 18, the organization Voices for Virginia's Children ranks the Commonwealth 49th.

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Government & Politics
5:56 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Where Were they Born to Run?

Accusations are flying in Virginia’s gubernatorial contest about whether someone born outside of the Commonwealth is well suited to serve. Upon flipping through some records, our Capitol Hill reporter found that Virginians aren’t really wedded to the idea of being represented by native sons - or daughters.

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Government & Politics
2:48 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

First Debate for Candidates for Governor

Republican Ken Cuccinelli and Democrat Terry McAuliffe are close in the latest polls. But the two major party candidates for Virginia Governor are far apart on almost all the issues. 

In their first debate, sponsored by the Virginia Bar Association, the two men set the tone for what is likely to be a tough, hard campaign. 

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Science & Technology
1:54 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Smarter Phones Get Smarter

Cell phones seem to be everywhere, but they’re not always easy for everyone to use. An industrial design class at Virginia Tech invented a very smart, smartphone designed for people missing a limb… and everyone else.  

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Government & Politics
6:32 am
Mon July 22, 2013

VaNews for 07.22.13

A more accurate method of detecting Lyme Disease could be soon be available thanks to research being done in Virginia and for seafood lovers, a crab of a different color. Those stories have been among the most popular this past week at the Virginia Public Access Project’s VaNews link on VPAP.org. 

 

VaNews is a free public service of the Virginia Public Access Project and can be found at vpap.org.

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Jim Kent is originally from Brooklyn, N.Y. A freelance writer and radio journalist who currently lives in Hot Springs, South Dakota.  Jim can be heard on a variety of radio programs including National Public Radio, South Dakota Public Radio, and National Native News Radio. He is also a columnist for the Rapid City Journal and a guest columnist for the Lakota Country Times.

Former editor of The New Lakota Times, and a correspondent with a variety of Native American newspapers, Jimâ

Frannie Kelley is an Editor for NPR Music.

In this position, Kelley is responsible for editing, producing and reporting NPR Music's coverage of hip-hop, R&B and the ways the music industry affects the music we hear, on the radio and online. She is co-editor of NPR's music news blog, The Record, and co-host of NPR's rap stream Microphone Check, with Ali Shaheed Muhammad.

Larkin got her start in radio as a newsroom volunteer in 2006. She went on to work for 90.5 as a reporter, Weekend Edition host, and Morning Edition producer, before taking on her current role as the All Things Considered host in 2009. Larkin also curates a public radio news blog www.pfeffernews.org, which highlights great reporting from local stations around the country. She has won regional and statewide awards for her reporting, including stories on art, criminal justice, domestic violence, and breaking news. Her work has been featured across Pennsylvania and nationally on NPR.

Twitter: @wesaLarkin

Sarah Hulett became Michigan Radio's assistant news director in August 2011. For five years she was the station's Detroit reporter, and contributed to several reporting projects that won state and national awards.

Sarah considers Detroit to be a perfect laboratory for great radio stories, because of its energy, its struggles, and its unique place in America's industrial and cultural landscape.

Before coming to Michigan Radio, Sarah spent five years as state Capitol correspondent for Michigan Public Radio. She's a graduate of Michigan State University.

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