Back to the Blue Ridge on WVTF

Back to the Blue Ridge is WVTF's locally produced two hour weekly program featuring traditional acoustic music of the Blue Ridge Mountains and Piedmont region.

From traditional to contemporary bluegrass and old-time music to blues, gospel and a few Americana selections, host and producer Kinney Rorrer each weekend features an eclectic mix of music focusing on the tradition and culture of the region served by WVTF.

Kinney is a retired history professor at Danville Community College and an avid lover of old-time and bluegrass music.  As a musician, he's known for his skill as an old-time banjo picker.

Prairie Home Companion on WVTF

Prairie Home Companion started production in 1974. Live every Saturday night from 6:00-8:00 pm and rebroadcast Sundays 12:00-2:00 pm on WVTF, A Prairie Home Companion features comedy sketches, music, and Garrison Keillor's signature monologue, "The News from Lake Wobegon."

Keillor is the host and writer of A Prairie Home Companion heard on public radio stations across the country and the author of more than a dozen books, including Lake Wobegon Days, The Book of Guys, Love Me and Homegrown Democrat.

Weekend Classics on WVTF

WVTF presents the classics as selected by our creative music director Steve Brown and played by our weekend hosts.  Preempted by the Metropolitan Opera during their season.

Playlists for specials aired during Weekend Classics

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Whad'ya Know on WVTF

Host and quiz master Michael Feldman showcases his signature political and social satire with a brief monologue, interesting and hilarious interviews and commentary. His quick-witted banter makes the Whad’ya Know quiz a popular feature of his show.

Car Talk on WVTF

Listening to Car Talk  is a weekend tradition for thousands of Click & Clack fans in central and western Virginia.

Each weekend Tom and Ray Magliozzi dispense mechanical advice along with a lot of laughs. America's funniest auto mechanics take calls from weary car owners all over the country, and crack wise while they diagnose Dodges and dismiss Diahatsus. You don't have to know anything about cars to love this one hour weekly laugh fest heard weekends on the WVTF network of signals.

Morning Classics on WVTF

The "classics" on WVTF covers a huge swath of chronological and artistic territory, from the plainchant of the Middle Ages to the bluesy, frenetic big-city rhythms of Leonard Bernstein, to show tunes and movie scores. Steve Brown, Cara Ellen Modisett, and Kevin Sanders play all the big hits that you love, but they also search out and present lesser-known pieces that'll make you say, "I'm glad I got the chance to hear that!" Besides the music, you'll get interesting background about the music and the musicians, with the occasional pithy observation about life in our part of the world as well as news updates, traffic and weather information. It's a mix that makes Afternoon Classics on WVTF a must-listen part of your daily routine.

Weekend Edition Sunday on WVTF

A companion to Weekend Edition Saturday and Morning Edition (weekdays), Weekend Edition Sunday premiered on January 18, 1987, and was the last of NPR's major news magazines to hit air. Since then, Weekend Edition Sunday has covered newsmakers and artists, scientists and politicians, music makers of all kinds, writers, thinkers, theologians and all manner of information including news that breaks on the weekend.

Weekend Edition Saturday on WVTF

Saturday mornings are made for Weekend Edition Saturday, the program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon. Drawing on his experience in covering 10 wars and stories in all 50 states and seven continents, Simon brings a humorous, sophisticated and often moving perspective to each show. He is as comfortable having a conversation with a major world leader as he is talking with a Hollywood celebrity or the guy next door.

Music and the Spoken Word

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir's first network radio program (with the organ, choir, and announcer sharing a single microphone) was transmitted on July 15, 1929. Today, after more than 80 years and over 4,100 broadcasts, Music and the Spoken Word  is the oldest continuous nationwide network broadcast in America.

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