Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is a journalist and broadcaster from Ghana who reports for NPR News on issues and developments related to West Africa. She spent her early years in Ghana, Italy, Britain and Kenya.

Quist-Arcton has lived and worked in the U.K., France, Ivory Coast, U.S., South Africa and most recently Senegal, traveling all over Africa as a journalist, broadcaster, commentator and host.

After completing high school in Britain, she took a degree in French studies with international relations and Spanish at the London School of Economics (LSE) and went on to study radio journalism at the Polytechnic of Central London, with two internships at the BBC.

Scott Horsley is a White House correspondent for NPR News. He reports on the policy and politics of the Obama Administration, with a special emphasis on economic issues.

The 2012 campaign is the third presidential contest Horsley has covered for NPR. He previously reported on Senator John McCain's White House bid in 2008 and Senator John Kerry's campaign in 2004. Thanks to this experience, Horsley has become an expert in the motel shampoo offerings of various battleground states.

Horsley took up the White House beat after serving as a San Diego-based business correspondent for NPR where he covered fast food, gasoline prices, and the California electricity crunch of 2000. He reported from the Pentagon during the early phases of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Jackie Northam is Foreign Affairs correspondent for NPR news. The veteran journalist has more than two decades of experience covering the world's hot spots and reporting on a broad tapestry of international and foreign policy issues.

Based in Washington, D.C., Northam is assigned to the leading stories of the day, traveling regularly overseas to report the news - from Afghanistan and Pakistan, to earthquake-ravaged Haiti.

Northam just completed a five year stint as NPR's National Security Correspondent, covering US defense and intelligence policies. She led the network's coverage of the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, traveling regularly to the controversial base to report on conditions there, and on US efforts to prosecute detainees.

Commentaries & Essays
4:47 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Merlin's Soul

For Christians, Easter sparks thoughts of resurrection and the human soul, but for Virginia veterinarian Douglass Hopkins it's a time to smile -- and to celebrate the souls of all living things.

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Now Labeled Cannabinoids
4:27 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Expanding the Synthetic Drug List

Virginia lawmakers concede that it may be impossible to create and amend laws that crack down on the ever-changing illegal drug trade, but they're determined to be as proactive as possible to deter it and prosecute those behind it.  

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Book End Generations
4:26 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

Spanning the Ages; The Intergenerational Program at Virginia Tech

Tim Mowry and a child finger paint with Shannon Jarrott

The youngest and the oldest people in our communities sometimes find themselves marginalized. 

Often they are seen in terms of what they take from society, because of what they cannot yet do, or what they can no longer do.

But Shannon Jarrott, who teaches human development at Virginia Tech, wants to change that using collaboration as her prime approach. Twice a week kids from Virginia Tech’s Child Development Center for Learning and research, a preschool program based at the University, get together with elders from the Adjacent Adult Day Services.

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Are Reparations History?
3:54 pm
Thu March 21, 2013

UVA Conference Considers Reparations for African Americans

Lawrie Balfour
Credit University of Virginia

The German government has compensated holocaust victims and their descendants. 

The U.S. has made reparations to Japanese Americans interned during the Second World War, and some have been talking about compensating the ancestors of enslaved Africans since the Civil War, when General Sherman proposed providing black families with 40 acres and a mule.  Now, experts are asking, “Is it time to forget about reparations?”

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Laura Sydell fell in love with the intimate storytelling qualities of radio, which combined her passion for theatre and writing with her addiction to news. Over her career she has covered politics, arts, media, religion, and entrepreneurship. Currently Sydell is the Digital Culture Correspondent for NPR's All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and NPR.org.

Sydell's work focuses on the ways in which technology is transforming our culture and how we live. For example, she reported on robotic orchestras and independent musicians who find the Internet is a better friend than a record label as well as ways technology is changing human relationships.

Northern Virginia Communities Healthiest
4:56 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Health Rankings Statewide

The annual County Health Rankings & Roadmaps lists Fairfax County as number 1, followed by Loudoun, Arlington, Albemarle, and York Counties. 

Meanwhile, Henry, Dickenson, Buchanan, and Tazewell Counties were at the bottom followed by the city of Petersburg, which had the least healthy residents. 

All 133 Virginia localities listed in the report were measured on the length and quality of life as well as health factors. 

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Government & Politics
4:29 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

Residency Requirements for Petition Circulators

The ACLU and the Libertarian Party have teamed up against Virginia to block a state law that requires candidate-petition circulators to be residents of the Commonwealth. 

A federal judge has already ruled in favor of the ACLU-Libertarian position.  ACLU attorneys believe if the state wins this appeal, it could prevent third-parties from gaining ground in the Commonwealth.

The Virginia Attorney General's office argued that allowing out-of-state residents to circulate petitions to get candidates on the ballot could open the floodgates for election fraud.  

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