Lloyd David Newell is the voice of the oldest continuous nationwide network radio broadcast in America, Music and the Spoken Word.

Governor Proposes Amendment for New Board
5:22 pm
Mon April 1, 2013

Struggling Schools

Opposition has continued to legislation that requires a new statewide school division to take over underperforming schools until they turnaround—even after Governor McDonnell proposed amendments last week. 

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Afternoon Classics on WVTF

The "classics" on WVTF covers a huge swath of chronological and artistic territory, from the plainchant of the Middle Ages to the bluesy, frenetic big-city rhythms of Leonard Bernstein, to show tunes and movie scores.

Steve Brown, Cara Ellen Modisett, and Kevin Sanders play all the big hits that you love, but they also search out and present lesser-known pieces that'll make you say, "I'm glad I got the chance to hear that!"

Besides the music, you'll get interesting background about the music and the musicians, with the occasional pithy observation about life in our part of the world as well as news updates, traffic and weather information.

It's a mix that makes Morning & Afternoon Classics on WVTF a must-listen part of your daily routine.

We at WVTF and RADIO are proud to recognize April as "Public Radio Music Month".

We have some exciting events planned during the month:

Federal Insurance Exchange
9:59 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Governor Seeks to Ban Abortion Coverage

State lawmakers are again taking sides in the battle over abortion. 

Governor McDonnell is now asking legislators to impose a limit on insurance policies to be sold here through a federal exchange – a place where Virginians who don’t have coverage through work or school can buy it.

In 2014, Virginians will be able to buy health insurance through a federally run exchange.  Some consumers will be eligible for tax breaks to help cover the cost of a policy, and for that reason organizations like the Family Foundation want to exclude abortion from coverage.  

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Star Scientific
9:38 am
Mon April 1, 2013

Tax Suit Raises Conflict of Interest Questions

The U.S. attorney’s office is investigating a Richmond area company that makes face cream and nutritional supplements. 

It’s called Star Scientific, and a complaint was filed in federal district court alleging the firm made false and misleading statements and failed to disclose potentially illegal transactions. 

The company says it has done nothing wrong. 

Meanwhile, reporters are finding links between Star Scientific and two of Virginia’s top political leaders – Governor Bob McDonnell and Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli. 

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Tracy Samilton covers the auto beat for Michigan Radio. She has worked for the station for 12 years, and started out as an intern before becoming a part-time and, later, a full-time reporter. Tracy's reports on the auto industry can frequently be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as on Michigan Radio. She considers her coverage of the landmark lawsuit against the University of Michigan for its use of affirmative action a highlight of her reporting career.

Tracy graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in English Literature. Before beginning her journalism career, she spent time working as a legal assistant at various firms in the Ann Arbor area.

School & Campus Security
3:57 pm
Sun March 31, 2013

Mental Health & Violence

The debate over gun control, school safety, and overall quality of life in the shadow of violence has waned somewhat, but when another violent incident occurs on the world stage, the question that will re-emerge is: "What are we going to do?"  

So to help prevent another Virginia Tech or Newtown massacre, the Governor's Task Force on School and Campus Security is again tackling the related challenges.  The Mental Health Working Group is slowly rolling out ideas that the members believe will address some overlooked issues.
 

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Russell Lewis is the Southern Bureau Chief for NPR News, a post he has held since 2006. Lewis focuses on the issues and news central to the Southeast — from Florida to Virginia to Texas, including West Virginia, Kentucky and Oklahoma. In addition to developing and expanding NPR's coverage of the region, Lewis assigns and edits stories from station-based reporters and freelancers alike, working closely with local correspondents and public radio stations. He also spent a year in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, coordinating NPR's coverage of the rebuilding effort. He's currently based in Birmingham, Alabama.

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