Arts & Culture
12:28 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Glass Haus Kitchen

A Charlottesville chef has won a kind of lottery, but he didn’t buy a ticket -- and he could have lost big.  For Chef Ian Boden, flavorful food is a lifelong obsession.  Now, he runs Charlottesville’s newest gourmet restaurant,  Glass Haus Kitchen.

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Melody wakes up very early in the morning to produce regional content for Morning Edition. She began at VPR as a part-time production assistant and was promoted to full-time in 2007. She has also served as a news and editorial assistant for The Burlington Free Press. After graduating from Skidmore College, she spent a year in France working as a high school teaching assistant. Melody grew up on a dairy farm in Addison County. She spends her free time gardening, cooking, and being outside as much as possible.

Frank Morris has supervised the reporters in KCUR's newsroom since 1999. In addition to his managerial duties, Morris files regularly with National Public Radio. He’s covered everything from tornadoes to tax law for the network, in stories spanning eight states. His work has won dozens of awards, including four national Public Radio News Directors awards (PRNDIs) and several regional Edward R. Murrow awards. In 2012 he was honored to be named "Journalist of the Year" by the Heart of America Press Club.

Morris grew up in rural Kansas listening to KHCC, spun records at KJHK throughout college at the University of Kansas, and cut his teeth in journalism as an intern for Kansas Public Radio, in the Kansas statehouse.

Emily’s love of music brought her to public radio, where she found her love for news. After receiving a Bachelor of Arts in music at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, she began her career in 2003 at WFIU Public Radio in Bloomington, Indiana, producing and hosting music and news programs and learning the behind-the-scenes work of public broadcasting. She joined WYSO in 2007 as the host of “All Things Considered” and jumped head first into news gathering. Emily’s been relishing it ever since-her reporting has earned her numerous AP Awards and a nationally recognized Gabriel Award. WYSO has been a fulfilling and exciting place for Emily, where she is privileged to work with a creative and supportive staff.

Tom Huizenga is a music producer, reporter and blogger for NPR Music. He hosts NPR's classical music blog Deceptive Cadence.

A regular contributor of stories about classical music on NPR's news programs, Huizenga regularly introduces intriguing new classical CDs to listeners on the weekend version of All Things Considered. He contributes to NPR Music's "Song of the Day."

Government & Politics
1:17 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Repackaging the GOP's Message

National Republican leaders are doing some soul searching after suffering losses in November. Some Virginia Republicans are wary of a new re-branding effort being conducted by the national party.

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Education
12:56 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Teachers Weigh in on the General Assembly Session

The dust has settled in Richmond.  Lawmakers and lobbyists have gone home, and educators are licking their wounds after failing to get much more money for public schools. 

Barbara Coyle is neatly dressed and coifed – polite and professional -- but a measure of frustration simmers under the surface when she talks about the plight of Virginia schools.

“The state dollars have been declining, the federal dollars have been declining and it’s been put back to the localities to make up that difference.”

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Environment
12:47 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Making Hydrogen from Plants

Scientists in biological systems engineering at Virginia Tech have succeed in using xylose, a sugar found in plants to produce large quantities of hydrogen in an environmentally friendly way. 

Unlike current methods of making hydrogen gas, Associate Professor Percival Zhang’s process is done at low temperatures, uses no heavy metals and releases almost no green house gases.  His team designed an enzyme cocktail for splitting of the hydrogen.  The result is energy production at a rate of more than 100% efficiency; a level current methods do not reach.

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Government & Politics
12:35 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Being Distracted While Walking

Virginia lawmakers may have just approved a measure to crack down on distracted driving, but the Commonwealth has another problem with preoccupied residents in the form of distracted pedestrians.

While this challenge has not garnered the attention of texting while driving, more Virginians are dying because of mobile devices and a lack of awareness. 

In 2011, Virginia had 75 pedestrian fatalities. A year later, the number rose significantly to 101.

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