International Correspondent Emily Harris is based in Jerusalem as part of NPR's Mideast team. Her post covers news related to Israel, the West Bank and Gaza Strip. She began this role in March of 2013.

Over her career, Harris has served in multiple roles within public media. She first joined NPR in 2000, as a general assignment reporter. A prolific reporter often filing two stories a day, Harris covered major stories including 9/11 and its aftermath, including the impact on the airline industry; and the anthrax attacks. She also covered how policies set in Washington are implemented across the country.

Graham Smith is a senior producer for NPR's All Things Considered.

Every day his responsibilities range from investigation and research, production, field recording, running the program, reporting, and photography.

Smith has worked all over the United States. Overseas Smith has worked in Iraq and Afghanistan, where he produced award-winning coverage of an IED attack and its aftermath in Kandahar.

50th Anniveresary of Tourist Train
4:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Cass Scenic Railroad

Credit Cass Scenic Railroad

Earlier this month the Shay Number 4 locomotive made the  eight-mile trip up Cheat Mountain, from the Cass Scenic Railroad depot in Pochantas County to the former work camp at Whittaker Station. 

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Beloved Steam Locomotive May Ride the Rails Again
4:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Fire Up the 611!

Credit Virginia Museum of Transportation

After months of study, officials with the Virginia Museum of Transportation believe they will find the financial support needed to get the iconic Norfolk & Western 611 Steam Locomotive back on the rails. The news comes as part of the “Fire Up 611” campaign—but officials say the effort will rely on rail fans worldwide to stoke her fire.

It’s a sound that’s captivated rail buffs for decades, the baritone whistle of the famous 611, affectionately known as the graceful giant.

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Government & Politics
4:34 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Virginia Latino Caucus

Before Democrats, including Vice President Joe Biden, converge on Richmond this weekend for their Jefferson-Jackson dinner, another caucus will take place.

The members say that as the Latino presence expands in Virginia, it's imperative for them to be politically involved—especially as lawmakers make decisions specific to their communities with or without their input.

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Proudly celebrating dual anniversaries: The RSO's 60th anniversary season and the 40th anniversary of RSO broadcasts on WVTF with appreciation to long time underwriter Grand Home Furnishings.

October 7, 7:30 p.m. live from the Roanoke Performing Arts Theater. “Opening Night: Symphonic Splendor” featuring cellist Zuill Bailey and more than 80 musicians performing masterworks by Korngold and Richard Strauss.  It will be an opening night to remember!

November 18, 7:30 p.m. – Recorded/Broadcast Delay. “RSO Homecoming” recorded November 10 at the Jefferson Center. Featuring pianist Vijay Venkatesh making his RSO debut in Liszt’s first piano concerto.

Choral Performance in Charlottesville
7:56 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Mozart's Requiem: A Summer Project for Students

While many of their peers are  swimming, biking, hiking or just goofing around this summer, more than three dozen high school students  from around the state have gathered in Charlottesville this week for a vocal labor of love - rehearsing and performing one of the most complex works of choral art ever.  A Mozart marathon now underway.

Judith Gary  is music director for the Virginia Consort, a singing ensemble in Charlottesville and one of five music professionals behind a remarkable summer experiment.
 

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Joe Neel is NPR's deputy senior supervising editor and a correspondent on the Science Desk.

As a leader of NPR's award-winning health and science coverage, Neel focuses on stories about medical research and health-care delivery. Neel assigns stories to reporters and correspondents, helps them produce the stories and edits the pieces for broadcast or publication on NPR.org. He is a frequent guest or contributor to NPR's programs, blogs, and podcasts.

Law & Crime
5:44 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

VA Attorney General Appeals to Defend Anti-Sodomy Law

Virginia’s attorney general is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to let the Commonwealth keep its law against sodomy on the books, because he claims it protects children from predators, but critics say we have other laws to do that, and Cuccinelli is simply playing politics.

In 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down an anti-sodomy law in the case of Lawrence v. Texas, saying it violated Americans’ constitutional right to privacy.

“The government can’t tell two consenting adults what they can do in private.”

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Government & Politics
5:37 pm
Wed June 26, 2013

DOMA Reaction

There’s mixed reaction in Virginia regarding the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in favor of federal recognition of all legal marriages. In a statement, the Attorney General's office says it will defend the Virginia Constitution, which defines marriage as the union between one man and one woman.  But, that position is pitted against another legal juggernaut, the ACLU, which is applauding the decision and says it will fight to pave the way for same-sex marriages within the state.

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