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Heading into the legislative session, both of Virginia’s lawmaking bodies remain controlled by Republicans. Two special elections in the state senate yesterday could have possibly flipped that control.

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In 1995, Virginia abolished parole -- a change that led to crowding of state prisons and longer stays behind bars.  Now, small cracks have developed in the legal wall that keeps about 30,000 people locked up.  Sandy Hausman reports on changes that could free some inmates.

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Lawmakers from across Virginia are in Richmond this week for the opening of the General Assembly session, which will last through the end of next month. Michael Pope has this preview.

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By default, jails have long been where homeless addicts get clean if they run afoul of the law. But a new local partnership is connecting inmates for the first time with long-term recovery, saving taxpayers tens of thousands of dollars in the process. Reporter Jordy Yager has the story.

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When students misbehave, how much discipline is too much? Lawmakers will be tackling that issue when they convene in Richmond for this year’s session.

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