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Shorter Stays Reported
5:08 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Inspector General Study on Access to Psychiatric Care

Some in the mental health field say it is not uncommon for a person suffering from mental illness to be turned away from treatment.  

National Alliance for Mental Illness Virginia Director Mira Signer says it happens more often than people think. The state Inspector General found that during a three-month case study alone, 72 Virginians who should have been detained were denied needed care.

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Access to Care
4:57 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Mental Health Services in the Spotlight

A community mental health organization is in the spotlight, after this week's attack on State Senator Creigh Deeds and the apparent suicide of his son. 

The Richmond Times-Dispatch said Gus Deeds had undergone a psychiatric evaluation Monday, but he was not admitted for in-patient care, because no hospitals in the area had psychiatric beds available.

But several facilities in the region report that they could have admitted Gus Deeds.

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Law & Crime
4:51 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Creigh Deeds' Well Wishers turn to Music-and Twitter

State Senator Creigh Deeds is one lawmaker who frequently updates his Facebook and Twitter accounts with what music he’s listening to.  Well wishers are now using music to send him messages of love and support.

While campaigning for Governor in 2009, Creigh Deeds tweeted he was listening to the likes of Merle Haggard, U2, and Talking Heads.  But now, while recovering at UVA Medical Center from stab wounds in an assault at his home, he can see what his friends and followers are listening to in his honor.  It all started with Candace Bryan Abbey, a friend of the Deeds’ family.

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Draper is for Dreamers
12:54 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Draper Mercantile & Trading Company

Credit Draper Mercantile

As the slogan says, Virginia is for lovers.  
But have you heard the one that goes, “Draper is for Dreamers”?

It often happens that you can be someplace for a long time and sort of not really see it anymore.  It can take newcomers to help re-open your eyes to what’s right in front of you.  Take those abandoned buildings still standing at forgotten crossroads southwestern Virginia; whitewash fading, boarded up windows, beautiful and compelling in their decay. That’s what led Debbie Gardner and her husband Bill to purchase the Draper Mercantile, 5 years ago.

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Liberal Arts Curriculum
11:40 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Humanities in Action

Liberal arts colleges represent about 4% of the entire cohort of college students who are going to be educated in one year. That’s a very small percentage that schools and even business leaders would like to see increased.

 

Tab O'Neal reports.

Gary Phillips is Dean of the College at Wabash College in Crawfordsville Indiana where they have been researching the impact of the “Humanities” on college students, graduates and the society at large.

They’re still mining the data of a study of 19,000 students from 49 institutions and Phillips says there are some key components of an effective liberal arts curriculum. "Undergraduate research with faculty, diversity experiences, service learning, high academic challenge and rigor; direct engagement with faculty and staff-who get into the lives of students up to their elbows-and provide opportunities to think diversely and engage persons different from them.”

Phillips calls those, “High Impact Practices,” and says their research shows measurable results in many student outcomes,  “Cognitive skill development, critical thinking, a sense of well-being, an ability to navigate conflict in diverse settings. We see when these high impact measure art put in place students change.”

Phillips says the age-old tension between breadth and specificity in education is one where a pendulum swings from one side-technical specific training--to the other-the humanities. He says it is the duty of liberal arts schools to make sure there is breadth.  “And that you also have represented in the majors that you have specificity and you have to have balance for effective education to take place.”

Phillips says there are important questions that need to be addressed when we consider the education of our children, “What is it that we are preparing the student to become in this day and age. What kind of man, what kind of woman. What kind of civic contributor. What is it about the human condition in our country that necessitates thinking about what we’re doing with therm in the classroom.”

Phillips says there are many attributes in a student of the humanities that employers look for beyond the task specific skills, “…individuals who can think about moral choices, who can write, who are able to communicate; who are able to discern differences and able to make a reasoned and informed judgment about their own culture and their set of values in contrast to others.”

20th at 7 p.m.
 

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