Science & Technology

Science and tech news

Scientists don’t often get involved in political campaigns, but in Virginia one of the nation’s leading men of science has stepped up to endorse a candidate for attorney general.

Three years ago, Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli demanded to see all of the e-mails and documents written by Professor Michael Mann during his years at the University of Virginia.  Mann and his colleagues had created a graphic showing how quickly the Earth was warming.  It looked like a hockey stick set on its side. 

The race to stay ahead of drug resistant ‘super bugs’ threatens to be a losing battle.  But a Blacksburg company is working on an innovative solution to the problem. 

Pure Genius

Apr 29, 2013
Discovery Channel

Who will become America’s next great innovator?  That’s the question the Discovery Channel is hoping to answer with a new reality show called, “The Big Brain Theory: Pure Genius.” A grad student from Virginia Tech is one of ten people chosen after they sent video applications to the producers.

Amy Elliot, a graduate student in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech is one of two women selected from thousands of applicants around the country. The Discovery Channel’s new reality TV show combines the drama of competition with the world of science, technology and engineering.

Golf by the Numbers

Apr 12, 2013

As the 2013 Masters Golf Tournament continues in Augusta, Georgia, a Roanoke College Professor of Mathematics says math is the most important skill for pros to duffers.

Ronald Minton is the author of the book, "Golf by the Numbers: How Stats, Math and Physics Affect Your Game." 

 Audio FileTab O'Neal talks with Roland Minton about math and the game of golf, from course to gear.Edit | Remove


 

Cyber Teachers

Mar 28, 2013
Virginia State University

Most educators agree that kids learn best when teachers tailor their approach, working one-on-one with students, but it’s too expensive for every child to have his or her own teacher. 

Now, however, a Virginia psychologist is hoping to create a computer that can teach individualized lessons, adjusting speed and content based on a student’s face.  

Could we create talking, thinking robots to work in our classrooms – providing individualized instruction?  Could a computer be taught to tell when a student is losing focus or getting confused?

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