Law & Crime

Legal and Criminal

Smithsonian Institute #888

Virginia’s Pamunkey  Tribe was dealt a setback in its effort to gain federal recognition by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Everyone knows Pocahontas, but do you know what tribe she hails from? Virginia’s Pamunkey Indians claim her as an ancestor. While Pocahontas and the Pamunkey have roots that predate the nation’s founding, the tribe isn’t recognized by the federal government because their records were destroyed early last century because a Virginia policy declared only two races: white and black.

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Governor McAuliffe will soon have to decide whether to veto a bill that limits police use of drones without search warrants or accept the fact that the Senate decided to reject his amendments. That’s just one of the bills that the General Assembly debated today during its annual Reconvened Session.

Lessons Learned at Virginia Tech: Why Risks Remain

Apr 15, 2015

It’s been eight years since a lone gunman killed 32 people at Virginia Tech, then took his own life.  In that time, colleges and universities have made many changes designed to prevent future tragedies, but real and growing problems remain.

Media coverage of mass shootings in this country could help to head off future attacks by making people more likely to report evolving problems.  Allen Groves is Dean of Students at the University of Virginia.

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It’s been eight years since a disturbed student went on a shooting spree at Virginia Tech, killing 32 people before taking his own life.  Since then, colleges and universities have made significant changes to prevent future tragedies.  

Since the shootings at Virginia Tech, a cottage industry has sprung up around campus security.  

“These are challenging times for colleges and universities. Crime on campus is more concerning than ever, tragic shootings, student suicides, injuries, suspicious behaviors, concerning events are coming from every direction.”

The Virginia Department of Forensic Science has achieved its 10,000th DNA data bank hit.  The record-setting cold hit was announced by Governor McAuliffe, who joined U.S. Senator Mark Warner for a tour of the state forensic lab that analyzes DNA and other crime-scene evidence.  

The DNA data bank has 431,000 samples, and hits now occur daily.  McAuliffe also announced that the state has been collecting untested and backlogged sexual assault evidence—called PERK kits—from localities statewide.

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