Law & Crime

Law & Crime
11:03 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Progress Made in Fighting Human Trafficking

The Polaris Project is an organization active in the fight against human trafficking in the U.S. and globally.

Pushing for stronger state laws, they rank states on their efforts fight trafficking. Virginia once had a poor score but that has changed.

Three years ago, Polaris Project ranked Virginia at "tier 4"—its lowest ranking—for efforts to fight human trafficking.

Since then, lawmakers have increased penalties, provided more tools to help law enforcement identify and track such cases, and backed awareness campaigns.

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The New Drug of Choice
6:19 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Virginia Not Immune to "Molly"

Police are waiting for results of an autopsy before closing the case of a 19-year-old University of Virginia student who died over the Labor Day weekend after taking a dose of the street drug known as Molly.  Police are warning the public against it.

Shelley Goldsmith was an honor student at UVA, and her father says she wasn’t one to use drugs, but shortly after midnight, at a rave in Washington, D.C., she may have ingested a powder known as Molly.

“It’s Ecstasy is what it is – MDMA.”

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Law & Crime
4:41 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Fairness Urged for Death Penalty Cases

Virginia’s laws and processes in administering the death penalty can and should be improved.  That’s according to a report unveiled through a project sponsored by the American Bar Association.

The goal of the Death Penalty Assessment Team’s findings is to reduce the risk of wrongful conviction or execution.

The purpose of the report was not to oppose or support capital punishment, according to Team member and former Attorney General Mark Earley.

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International Distribution
4:38 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Fake ID Ring Busted in Charlottesville

Federal investigators have closed the book on what could be the nation’s largest maker of fake identification – a Virginia company that made millions without advertising or even creating a website.  

Three people plead guilty to supplying up to 25,000 high-quality drivers’ licenses to customers around the world who learned about their services by word of mouth.

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Where Criminal Prosecutions Go Wrong
6:52 am
Wed September 4, 2013

UVA Law Professor on Convicting the Innocent

When DNA evidence began springing people from prison, prosecutors discovered just how unreliable eyewitnesses can be.  

Here in Virginia, 13 out of 16 cases of wrongful convictions involved inaccurate identifications.  That led the state to issue model procedures for dealing with witnesses, but after nearly two years, very few have put those recommendations into practice.

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