Law & Crime

Legal and Criminal

Montgomery Co. Sheriff's Dept.

After a tragic event, such as the murder of a young girl, as we saw in Blacksburg last week, how does the healing happen?  For Gil Harrington, it’s come from directing the power of her grief after her own daughter was murdered, toward founding an organization that’s become a national movement. 

Gil Harrington is a former nurse whose life changed in 2009 when her daughter Morgan was murdered in Charlottesville. So she knows of what she speaks.

Nicole Lovell Case Update

Feb 1, 2016

2/3 UPDATE: The bail hearing for a Virginia Tech student charged as an accessory in the stabbing death of 13-year-old Nicole Lovell was canceled today.

Natalie Keepers’ attorney had requested the hearing after she was charged with accessory after the fact, and illegally disposing of Lovell’s body.

A charge of being an accessory BEFORE the fact has since been filed. Another Virginia Tech student, David Eisenhauer, is charged with kidnapping and murder. Both he and Keepers are being held without bail-their next court appearance is set for March 28th. 

The Associated Press

A legal battle that began in a Gloucester, Virginia high school will be heard Wednesday in Richmond by a federal appeals court.

In question: whether a local school board can prohibit a transgender student from using the restroom of their choice.

The answer could guide school systems nationwide.

16-year-old Gavin Grimm has attended local school board meetings, and no wonder, those meetings have been about him.

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

While Virginia's legislature got back to work this week, the state's executive branch continues to try to tackle gun violence on its own.
In a first of its kind meeting, Attorneys General from Virginia, Maryland and D.C. met in Washington today to discuss how the regions can work together to reduce gun-related crime and deaths.

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring says reducing gun violence isn't just about preventing mass shootings.

Bill Would Save Petty Thieves from a Felony

Jan 13, 2016

Someone who steals merchandise valued at more than $200 can be convicted of a felony in Virginia – denied the right to vote, and required to tell employers about past criminal conduct.  Now, there’s a move in Richmond to raise the threshold for a charge of larceny, making it possible for thieves to steal up to $1,500 worth of stuff and be charged with a misdemeanor.  The idea has store owners seeing red as Sandy Hausman reports.

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