Health & Medicine

State officials are looking for ways to sustain a program aimed at improving the quality of life for Virginians who suffer from chronic diseases, including COPD, hypertension, and diabetes.  The state had funded this Chronic Disease Self-Management Education Program with a federal grant since 2010, but was recently turned down for another grant.

The program developed by Stanford University teaches patients about the steps they can take to control their chronic diseases and manage both symptoms and common problems.

Adverse Childhood Experiences Effects on Later Life Examined

Sep 21, 2015

Children subjected to repeated trauma are significantly more likely to have high levels of chronic disease. That’s according to research findings presented to the Joint Commission on Health Care, which also looked at the effects of trauma on the young brain. The findings could result in a paradigm shift toward early diagnosis and treatment.

“Adverse Childhood Experiences” include deprivation, abuse, feeling unloved, witnessing violence, and other traumas.  Dr. Allison Jackson said they disrupt neurological development-as seen in a photo of a neglected child’s brain.

Creative Commons

Richmond is known for its historic capital building, its stately cemeteries, a world class art museum and, now, a stellar ambulance service.  The National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians voted to honor Richmond for innovation. 

“Paramedics.  What’s the address you need an ambulance to come to?  Okay, tell me exactly what happened.”

Each year, more than 60,000 people in Richmond require an ambulance.  That’s a big number for a city with fewer than 220,000 residents - but Danny Garrison, director of communications, says the rush hour brings a much bigger crowd.

For the most part, the public knows the positions of each side in the battle over Medicaid expansion in Virginia—but what about the stakeholder organizations that provide services? They say they're caught in the middle and would like to see some legislative movement before key services—and even hospitals themselves—become casualties in the battle over how to fund healthcare. 

Over the past several years, Virginia has seen its share of mass shootings, targeted killings, high-profile suicides, and a growing number of crimes all associated with both mental health and criminal justice.

To address what some have labeled an epidemic, the state has created a new Center for Behavioral Health and Justice.  And, it’s a means to streamline and coordinate resources and services. 

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