Education

collegiate-va.org

Although recent international terrorist attacks have shocked the world, they’ve had little impact on the day-to-day lives of most Virginians. But for one private school outside of Richmond, incidents of global terrorism have hit close to home. 

Collegiate School's manicured campus in Richmond's suburbs seems worlds away from the streets of Paris and the neighborhoods of Beirut, but step inside Rhiannon Boyd's classroom and the distance shrinks.

About 2,000 college students in Virginia won’t have to pay back some of their student loans, thanks to a state settlement with the Education Management Corporation. That company owns a handful of for-profit colleges in Virginia that have been under investigation for lying to students about job placement rates and graduates’ salaries. 

Last March Sweet Briar College's then Board and President announced that due to insurmountable financial challenges the school was closing. The news not only shocked the small Amherst County liberal arts school but alumnae from across the country. They rallied, formed Saving Sweet Briar, and through legal action and a new board and president the school stayed open. Tab O'Neal reports that while the doors are open, the future holds a lot of challenges:

    

Farm Bounty on the School Lunch Tray

Oct 14, 2015

Virginia recently celebrated farm-to-school week, highlighting the connection between farmers around the state and what’s on the tray in the lunch line.

But for one private school in Richmond, farm-to-table is more than just one week out of the year.

St. Andrews Elementary School in Richmond had some unusual visitors for lunch earlier this month -- chickens.

The two Rhode Island Reds were part of a lesson on healthy eating. Kindergarteners through fifth graders got to learn what the chickens eat, and how their diet affects the eggs they produce.

AP File Photo/Ted S. Warren

Virginia has begun distributing the funds from a $17.5 million-dollar federal grant to expand and enhance the Commonwealth’s early childhood education efforts.  Governor McAuliffe toured one of the schools that received money for its program and explained that the funds will be awarded to 11 high-need school divisions.

The Governor says the federal grant will bring additional children into the Virginia Preschool Initiative, which currently serves 18,000 at-risk four-year-olds.

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