Education

Virginia's school superintendents are applauding the General Assembly’s recent efforts to reduce the number of standardized SOL tests administered to students from 34 to 27.  But they also say that more reforms are needed moving forward—and they’ve outlined them in a new Blueprint for the Future of Education. 

Handcuffed Preschooler Reinstated in Greene

Jan 15, 2015

After some public uproar and contact from a civil liberties group, the four-year-old who was cuffed and shackled by a Greene County school resource officer will be invited back to school with his record wiped clean. The fight, however, goes on.

The Charlottesville-based Rutherford Institute is claiming a victory of sorts on behalf  of the misbehaving pre-schooler who was hauled out of class, handcuffed, placed in a squad car, and then-- back at the sheriff's office-- locked in leg irons.

House Republicans Outline Education Agenda

Jan 8, 2015
Creative Commons, Flickr

Ahead of next week's start of the Virginia General Assembly Session, GOP lawmakers are rolling out new initiatives in public education. 

One reform is a revamped version of an unpopular law—which they say should be more useful to parents and stakeholders.  

GOP Delegates say they want to help students develop real-world, critical thinking skills—which are not achieved through multiple-choice testing.  In order to do that, House Majority Leader Kirk Cox says more teacher professional development is needed, including a process to share best practices.

Bill Might Halt Handcuffs On School Kids

Jan 8, 2015

Last fall's controversial handcuffing and shackling of a Greene County pre-schooler might have been prevented by a new bill that could soon make its way through the General Assembly.




Delegate Dickie Bell will introduce a measure calling on the state’s Education Department to regulate the use of restraints on students. His bill was already in the works when he heard that an officer had cuffed and shackled a four-year-old.



The University of Virginia

Fraternities and sororities at the University of Virginia will be operating under new rules when students return to campus Monday. 

President Teresa Sullivan has accepted suggestions from leaders of the Greek community, putting them into new agreements to be signed by each house. 

Among other things, fraternities must have at least three sober members during any event where alcohol is served.  They will be assigned to pour glasses of wine and to guard stairs leading to bedrooms.  

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