Education

A new exhibit at the Blacksburg Children’s Museum features satellite imagery of the area and a real time weather station to show how geography and climate are related.  

The terrain in and around Blacksburg is breathtaking with its mountain ridges, forests and waterways. 

And, the view from hundreds of miles up is a great way to appreciate it. 

whitehouse.gov

What if high-schoolers in Virginia could take a computer programming class instead of French or Spanish? Lawmakers in Richmond are considering allowing that swap, as one way to get more kids into computer science.

With talk of gigahertz and infinite loops, Intro to Computer Programming at Henrico County’s Deep Run High School, certainly sounds like a foreign language class. And if some Virginia lawmakers get their way, it could also count as a foreign language.

Creative Commons

The general public might think of universities as places for learning – and that would make teaching a valued resource, but a growing number of people at the head of college classrooms are making less than the minimum wage, have no job security and no benefits.  In this three-part series, Sandy Hausman reports that a majority of college instructors are not tenured or even on track to full-time, tenured positions.

Rose Forp spent many years training adults in the workplace.  Over time, it dawned on her that she loved to teach.

Creative Commons

Virginia Tech is looking to become a leader in inclusion and diversity on campus with new programs and a new person to guide them.

The freshman class at Virginia Tech this year is not only the largest in the university’s history, it’s also the most diverse. Next month a new vice provost for inclusion and diversity will lead the effort to build upon that. 

Menah Pratt-Clarke hales from the University of Illinois, where she held a similar position.  Here’s how she describes her goals.

Cops In Classrooms

Jan 25, 2016

Last spring, the Center for Public Integrity named Virginia as the state most likely to call the cops on kids at school.  Now, the Legal Aid Justice Center is calling on Virginia’s legislature to do something about that.

  Children in Virginia are three times more likely than kids in other states to be arrested at school, and the Legal Aid Justice Center says the odds are even higher in certain communities and for certain children. 

“There’s massive racial disparities and there’s massive disparities with respect to students with disabilities.”

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