Economics & Economy

Kai Ryssdal

Now that the Senate health care bill has been released, it’s being digested by all the relevant interested parties. Some of those interested parties are people running the state heath exchanges created under the Affordable Care Act. Peter Lee is the executive director of Covered California, California's health exchange and the first created after the bill became law back in 2010. He talked with Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal about the health care policy conversation in Washington. The following is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Republican Arkansas looks to cut its once-expanded Medicaid rolls

Jun 22, 2017
Sarah Whites-Koditschek

Willie Freeman works in the meat department at Edward’s Food Giant in Little Rock, Arkansas. He is 54 and has been insured through the Affordable Care Act for four years.

“All the time. I use it all the time,” he said.

His job pays $9 an hour, too much for him to be on traditional Medicaid, which covers low-income people, and too little to be in the health care exchange.

But because Arkansas opted to expand Medicaid to fill the gap, Freeman was able to start going to the doctor.

Dan Boyce

President Trump has ordered Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review whether more than 20 large areas designated as national monuments should remain protected. The goal is to determine if monument status too greatly restricts access to public land and economic activity, like timber cutting or oil and gas drilling.

Marketplace staff

Many view the divisions in our current political environment through a "conservative vs. liberal" or "Democrat vs. Republican" filter. After all, a large number of people in both of the major political parties have said that the other group elicits feelings of fear and anger

Marketplace

At long last, Senate Republicans have revealed their health care bill. It was hatched in secret, and they hope to vote on it in a week so let's dig in. It's similar to the plan passed by the House: Sharp and sweeping cuts to Medicaid, more power to states to decide what insurance plans have to cover, shrinking the Obamacare subsidies. Here's what it won't do: make health care cheaper. We'll talk about why, then head to Arkansas, where a plan to roll back Medicaid expansion will put tens of thousands back on the exchanges, if they can afford it.

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