Economics & Economy

A move from natural gas to electricity for homes

Oct 17, 2017

Not long ago natural gas – the fuel that probably gave you your hot shower this morning – was being hailed as the clean “bridge” fuel, because it polluted less than other alternatives. For some purposes it still is, such as when it replaces diesel fuel in buses. But in our homes, some now believe natural gas should be phased out in favor of electric appliances, for climate reasons.

10/17/2017: The fight to become Amazon's next home

Oct 17, 2017

(U.S. Edition) Canadian jet manufacturer Bombardier has been in an ongoing trade fight with America's Boeing. Well, now Bombardier is selling the majority stake of its C-series plane to the French company Airbus. We'll report on why the Canadian company went through with the deal and how it may be able to sidestep a high U.S. tariff as a result. Afterwards, we'll discuss whether Congress can help make consumer data safer, and then  look at Seattle's bid to become home to Amazon's second headquarters. 

Two dozen people zigzag through Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, footsteps crunching on pavement and gravel. A local blog called The Urbanist organized the tour about the history of this neighborhood — the location of Amazon’s first headquarters.

In a few years, the view around HQ1 has morphed from low-slung warehouses to tall, modern apartment buildings and cranes that poke out of construction sites around every bend.

“It looks like a millennial paradise,” said Seattle resident Anthony Bridgewater, who took the tour.

(Global Edition) From the BBC's World Service ... The partnership sees Airbus take a majority stake in Bombardier's C-Series jet and analysts say it could have huge implications for the industry. The planes can be assembled inside the U.S., potentially avoiding the crippling 300 percent import tariff the U.S. government wants to see imposed. The deal hasn't been welcomed by U.S. rival Boeing — they complain that the firms receive too much state support. In China, preparations are underway for the Communist Party Congress, which begins tomorrow.

In the past few years, venture capitalists have invested more than $1.6 billion into companies working with low-earth orbit technology. Some of those companies are making small satellites that orbit closer to Earth than traditional ones. The goal: to blanket Earth with broadband internet and gather data on the planet. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talks to the innovators behind this mission.

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