Economics & Economy

Farmers' Markets on the Rise

Apr 17, 2014

There are now  more than 240 farmers' markets statewide, an increase of about 180% since 2006.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services says if every household in the state spends ten-bucks  a week on locally-grown food, it would mean a $1.6 billion dollar investment back into the economy.

You can find a list of farmers' markets across Virginia here.

Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services

Nestled in almost every corner of Virginia is a small operation transforming something that's just edible--into a delectably palatable creation.

Some can only be found in mom and pop stores, farmer's markets, and, occasionally, the larger grocer or restaurant chains. But every two years, the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services showcases these businesses and their products at the Virginia Food and Beverage Expo.

 

When the final buzzer sounded on Sunday, University of Virginia fans had cause to celebrate, but for Mark Mincer, the victory over Duke meant lots of work ahead. 

The president of a store founded by his grandfather in 1948, Mincer called in family members to prepare for crowds.

Lines formed at Mincer’s on the Corner this week as fans like former UVA administrator George Thompson showed their pride with a purchase.

“I got two really neat T-shirts here.  Love UVA.  Love UVA basketball.  Love Joe Harris.  So this is your year!  This is our year, and we’re excited.”

Photo by Ivan Morozov.

What will it be like to live in the New River Valley over the next twenty years?

Well, that depends on what happens now that a 3 year study on livability in the NRV is complete and ready to be acted upon.  

More than 3,000 people from all over the New River Valley weighed in on which issues they’re most concerned about for the future of this region; including housing, transportation, energy, environment, and cultural assets which define this part of south western Virginia. 

Juicy Business

Jan 29, 2014

Starting a business can be complicated, and you might feel ill-prepared without an MBA, but a Charlottesville woman who has the degree decided not to bother with focus groups or financial analysis. 

Instead, she trusted her gut, and is building a company using common sense.

A couple of years ago, an Australian filmmaker named Joe Cross came to America to make a documentary about his quest for better health.  He called it Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead.

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