Economics & Economy

Got a cold or the flu? Think twice about antibiotics

Jul 18, 2018

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine has found urgent care centers are prescribing antibiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu. Generally antibiotics are effective against bacterial infections like pneumonia. Antibiotics do not work to treat viral infections, like the flu and colds.

When antibiotics can become a problem

Jul 18, 2018

(Markets Edition) The construction of new homes in the U.S. plunged in June, according to data out today. We'll chat with Susan Schmidt, senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group, about how much of a cause for concern this is. Afterwards, we'll discuss a new study that finds urgent care centers are prescribing antiobiotics to nearly half of patients with colds or the flu, which could actually end up harming patients.

The California Lottery is breaking sales records. This year, revenues will soar to an estimated $6.9 billion. The recent boom has been fueled by a wave of gigantic jackpots. Newer games like Powerball and a $30 scratch ticket offer huge prizes, and California's lottery players have responded by gambling more and more. Surging revenue should be good news for the state's schools, the lottery's only beneficiary.

The order you were born can have an impact on how successful you are in life, according to Sandra Black, an economics professor at the University of Texas at Austin.

In her research, Black has found that first-born children tend to do better than their younger siblings when it comes to education and earnings. After the first-born, there's a declining pattern by birth order, with the second-born doing "a little bit worse than the first-born" and so on, she says. 

(U.S. Edition) The European Commission is set to fine Google a record $5 billion over antitrust practices related to its Android system. We'll explore what this ruling could mean for the way Google operates. Afterwards, we'll discuss why MGM is planning to sue some of the victims in last October's mass shooting in Las Vegas. Plus: We'll explore the economics of birth order with economics professor Sandra Black. She talked to us about evidence that shows first-born children tend to better when it comes to earnings and education.

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