Economics & Economy

(U.S. Edition) With the House GOP set to vote today on its plan for American taxes, we'll chat with someone who's been through a big tax overhaul before: Gene Steuerle, who heads the non-partisan Tax Policy Center. He joined us to talk about the basic principles most people can agree with when it comes to tax reform. Afterwards, we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about how Congress' tax plans might affect none other than President Donald Trump.

 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service ... There are some fresh warnings today about serious risks facing China's economy. A senior government official told a conference in Beijing the country's financial sector needs quick reform to avoid crisis. Afterwards, a new study says many of the effects of climate change are inevitable, even if the world radically cuts carbon dioxide emissions now. Then, we hear from a French winemaker about the hype and history of Beaujolais Nouveau Day.

Toronto is building a billion-dollar mini smart city

Nov 16, 2017

Not all tech is in Silicon Valley. Many cities around the world are trying to grow their own industries. Recently, the city of Toronto partnered with Sidewalk Labs, a subsidiary of Alphabet, to build a billion-dollar mini smart city on its waterfront. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood spoke with Mayor John Tory while he was in New York looking to increase tech investments. Below is an edited transcript of their conversation.

Molly Wood: How local is the local tech economy doing?

11/16/2017: Smart cities are collecting your data

Nov 16, 2017

Smart-city technology is becoming more common, from Singapore to San Jose. The latest city to incorporate this technology into its infrastructure is Toronto. It recently partnered with Alphabet subsidiary Sidewalk Labs to redevelop a section of city waterfront. Lots of sensors will collect data on traffic, noise and temperature. Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood talked with Toronto Mayor John Tory about the city’s tech investments and how data collection will be regulated.

Last night Senate Republicans made some major changes to their mammoth tax bill, including some improvements for the middle class. But these credits and lower rates are temporary — they would sunset beginning in 2025, and tax cuts for corporations would be permanent. Plus, we talk about changes to the financial regulatory environment under the Trump administration, a potential merger between giants AT&T and Time Warner and play part two of our report on the health risks associated with fracking operations.

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