Economics & Economy

02/23/2018: Can "Black Panther" shake up Hollywood?

23 hours ago

(Markets Edition) The big financial story of this week: what the guardians of interest rates said about future interest rates. Christopher Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, stopped by to talk with us about how difficult it is to forecast inflation. Afterwards, we'll discuss news that the Chinese government has seized control of Anbang, the firm that owns some famous U.S. properties. Plus: We talk about whether "Black Panther" will help create more opportunities in Hollywood for black actors.

Will “Black Panther” be a game changer?

Feb 23, 2018

"Black Panther" moves into its second weekend in theaters having already posted half a billion dollars at the box office. Sure, it’s a Disney film based on a Marvel comic book, but could it also be a game changer for how Hollywood looks at mostly black casts and distinctly African narratives? 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The National Rifle Association has backed President Trump's call to arm teachers in the wake of the Florida and other deadly school shootings.

Trump advocated arming school officials, only "if they really have the aptitude." But would this actually help people in the midst of a crisis? 

Real ID fuels demand for passports

Feb 23, 2018

You may have been hearing about something called "Real ID" lately. The Real ID Act, passed in 2005, requires U.S. fliers to have a new, more secure kind of ID card to get through TSA checkpoints. About half of U.S. states are issuing driver licenses that comply, while the rest have been given extensions to get there. When it comes to Real ID, travelers have some choices to make.

Click the audio player above for the full story. 

Supreme Court to hear arguments on "fair-share" union dues

Feb 23, 2018

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Janus v. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees — a case that some view as the biggest threat to labor unions in years. If the justices rule in favor of the plaintiffs, millions of public-sector workers would be able to opt out of paying dues to their labor union.

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