Economics & Economy

Jana Kasperkevic

Carl’s Jr. and Hardee’s are trying to clean up their reputation, nixing the "babes and burgers" campaign beloved by former CEO Andy Puzder. Gone is the image of a company that caters to the whims of the red-blooded American male. Gone are the ads featuring women in skimpy bikinis that were favored by Puzder. Now the focus is on what CKE Restaurants, the parent company, says matters most: food.

Blog: Fix transportation or commute via VR?

Mar 29, 2017
Molly Wood

There are lots of companies out there promising to revolutionize transportation and mobility.

Ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft suggest that car ownership itself is absurd, and their fleets of human-driven or self-driving cars will get you anywhere you want to go. Car companies like Ford and GM are working on autonomous cars and even investing in fleets of vehicles that can be shared among occasional users.

Marketplace

The British government has fired the starting gun on Brexit. After more than four decades of membership of the European Union, the British government has officially notified its European partners that the U.K. is leaving the bloc. Two years of wrangling will now begin as Britain negotiates the terms of its departure and the shape of its new trading relationship with the 27 remaining member states. That relationship will certainly be less beneficial for British companies after Brexit.

Intel says Moore’s Law lives on

Mar 29, 2017
Molly Wood

It’s time for a little refresher on something called Moore's Law: More than half a century ago, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that, essentially, processor power would increase exponentially over time.

Yes, it's more complicated than that. But for decades, the general principle has pretty much held true, leading to faster and cheaper computing power that enables supercomputers in our pockets, self-driving cars, smart refrigerators and more.

Feuds and fault-lines loom in UK-EU showdown over Brexit

Mar 29, 2017
Associated Press

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May says Brexit is an opportunity to build an "independent, self-governing, global Britain.'' European Parliament chief negotiator Guy Verhofstadt says it's "a tragedy, a disaster, a catastrophe.''

Britain and the EU see the U.K.'s looming exit from the European Union rather differently. As Britain officially starts the two-year exit process with Wednesday's triggering of Article 50, here's a look at some of the feuds and fault-lines that lie ahead:

Money, money, money

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