Economics & Economy

Nancy Marshall-Genzer

A new study from Creditcards.com says 87 percent of cardholders who asked for a late fee waiver and 67 percent who requested a lower interest rate were granted their requests, just for asking. The problem is only about 1 in 4 cardholders is making these kinds of requests. So why don’t people negotiate more? Do they not know that banks can be flexible? The survey suggests that it pays to be tough and negotiate. 

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Marketplace

Iran responds to U.S. sanctions with their own, aimed at U.S. companies that do business with Israel. Marketplace's Marielle Segarra discusses which companies are involved and what it means for them. Then we turn to Nigeria, where pollution from an oil spill is still astonishingly high almost a decade after two Shell pipelines burst. Plus, how mobile solar-powered vehicle chargers are changing the landscape of the electric car industry.

JaeRan Kim

The push to get more electric vehicles on the road has been hampered by the lack of readily available charging stations. Remedying that problem isn’t a quick fix, since it takes a lot of work to build up the necessary infrastructure. Some are taking advantage of the slow transition to build a business around the need for charging.

On a recent Friday, Desmond Wheatley, president and CEO of Envision Solar, was backing his Chevy Bolt into an EV Arc station in the parking lot of the Rancho Park Golf Course in Los Angeles.

Will the iPhone (RED) boost Apple's sales?

Mar 24, 2017
Jana Kasperkevic

Apple’s new iPhone 7 — a distinctly colored red iPhone — is on sale today. The newest iPhone is a collaboration between Apple and Bono’s (RED) Campaign, but while the phone is connected to a charitable cause, it may also mean a bump in sales.

Scott Tong

An insider says pollution from a Nigerian oil spill in a pipeline owned by Shell's parent company remains “astonishingly high” nearly a decade on.

In 2008, two Shell pipelines burst in a part of Nigeria known as the Bodo community. Local villagers asserted in court that the amount spilled equals that of the Exxon Valdez tanker disaster from 1989.

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