Economics & Economy

There might be a way to eliminate traffic jams

Aug 26, 2016
David Lazarus and Crystal Castle

Next weekend for Labor Day, AAA estimates that 35 million Americans will travel. And about 86 percent are due to fill up their gas tanks for one final summer road trip. 

The company also estimates that it costs about 57 cents a mile to drive. But with so many people on the road, most of that fuel will be wasted idling in traffic. However, there is a glimmer of hope. Benjamin Seibold, a professor at Temple University who studies traffic, said jams can be mitigated simply by changing the way you drive. 

Molly Wood

When it comes to TV screen resolution, apparently you can never have too many Ks.

Panasonic and Sony are teaming up to produce and sell 8K TVs by 2020. Those screens would essentially offer eight times the resolution of a standard high definition television set, so it seems like a good time for the return of my new segment: Tech Intervention.

You know what? You can have too many Ks. We're not going to need 8K TVs in 2020.

Americans are eating more cheese than ever

Aug 26, 2016
Donna Tam

You might think it’s your American duty to buy a few extra blocks of cheddar this weekend, given the U.S. government's need to purchase surplus cheese in order to help the dairy industry. But rest assured. You have already played your part.

Americans are eating more cheese than ever — consuming over 34 pounds per capita in 2015 — and there’s no end in sight for our love with this dairy staple.

Supermarket price wars heating up

Aug 26, 2016
Adam Allington

Competition is heating up between America's biggest grocery chains, and food prices are falling as a result. Discount retailer Dollar General said Thursday that it's cutting prices on hundreds of items across 2,000 stores.

The strategy follows a similar path set forth by other chains such as Wal-Mart, Kroger and Trader Joe's. Cutting costs to get people in the door is a time-tested strategy, but it could mean slimmer margins for both grocery stores and suppliers.

As it turns out, that could be a risky move.

Moving manufacturing jobs to Mexico isn't a bad thing

Aug 26, 2016
David Lazarus and Crystal Castle

It isn't news that there has been a drop in manufacturing employment. 

In fact, those jobs have been in decline since the 1970s, and have dropped by 5 million since 2000. But what may come as a surprise is that the jobs that have left the United States and relocated south of the border have actually benefited workers in the United States. In order to produce commodities, Mexico needs to consume a chunk of good from the U.S. About 40 cents of every dollar that the United States imports from Mexico comes from the U.S.

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