Economics & Economy

Holiday jobs changing to keep up with online demand

2 hours ago

Some of the country’s major retail chains are in trouble this holiday season, closing stores and losing evermore sales to online shopping sites. And yet, hiring of temporary seasonal retail workers is predicted to be about on par with 2016, according to a report by outplacement firm Challenger Gray & Christmas.

(U.S. Edition) The Trump administration is now set to roll back network neutrality, which says all internet traffic has to be treated equally. We'll explain how all of this would work. Think of the web as a highway, and content providers like Netflix as the cars who now may have to pay extra for high-speed lanes. Next, we'll discuss the European Union's decision to choose new cities to host two European agencies that had been based in London.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Tencent — a huge Chinese tech firm that's barely known globally — has jumped in value to over half a trillion dollars to become one of the biggest companies in the world. Afterwards, global food prices could start to rise in 2018 because of uncertainty over climate and trade deals, according to a report out today by Rabobank. Then, in a global first, a London company called Bio-Bean is using coffee-waste powered London buses.

Hollywood actress Hedy Lamarr, "the Angelina Jolie of her day," was also an avid inventor and the person behind advances in communication technology in the 1940s that led to today’s Wi-Fi, GPS, and Bluetooth.

Alexandra Dean is the director and producer of a new documentary about Lamarr called “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story.”

Tech in retail, from the good to the gimmicky

3 hours ago

Stores are trying their hardest this holiday season to compete with online shopping by using technology to encourage more in-store buying. Some of this tech is already noticeable. There are more sales associates on the floor available to ring you up with a mobile devices, more in-store charging kiosks for customer's to park their cell phones while they shop, and interactive "magic mirrors" that let customers call for help or share photos of what they're trying on with friends or on social media.

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