Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

You’ve probably seen it in your garden, along roadways, just about everywhere: Garlic Mustard.  It’s an invasive plant that stealthily out-competes native species, threatening the diversity of forests in many parts of the country. But what if there were a recipe to change that?

They don’t call it garlic mustard for nothing. Rachel Collins is Associate Professor of Biology at Roanoke College. 

“The chemical that it’s making that smells like garlic is one of these herbivore defense chemicals like basil and all the other yummy flavors in bail and mint.”

When it comes to writing about controversial current events, sometimes fiction can go where journalism cannot.  A novel by a former journalist examines political corruption and the misdeeds of the powerful.  And while it may be a work of fiction, its author says it’s based on real events, people and places. 

“I had to change a lot of names, so I had that liberty to flesh things out, to make them larger than life and, of course, to make them dramatic.”

Laura Weeks

Speaking with people who spend their days in shelters throughout cities can yield powerful, heartbreaking, and sometimes surprising narratives. One Roanoke photojournalist did just that for a project aimed at depicting those going through a difficult time in a different light. 

"I was never the type to judge a book by its cover. I was always the book that got judged. Everyone is fighting their own battles."

VMFA

There’s big excitement in Richmond over a surprising find - a work of art that carries an important message from the cradle of Western civilization.  Here’s what the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts bought from a dealer in London. 

In modern times, it’s common to hear conversations about race relations, but less is known about how people who looked different got along in ancient times. 

Now comes a work of art that offers an important clue. Peter Schertz is a curator at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Sometimes it seems like so many new discoveries are being made, that it’s hard to keep up with all the new knowledge coming at us each day.  Well, you have researchers to thank for that.  People, who get curious about something, then make a plan to find out more.

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