Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Uprooting Appalachia

Sep 8, 2015

The image of “Appalachia” many people have today came from a 1964 Life Magazine story that featured the town.  Now researchers are looking to add another chapter to the story of the small southwestern Virginia town, written in the voices of people who live there today. 

“You know how it got its name, don’t you? This guy had a big old bucket. And he had a whole lot of apples in it and these kids kept messing with it and he said, if y’ all don’t stop that I’m going to throw an Apple a’cha.”

UVA Grads Share Diverse Art Collections

Sep 8, 2015

It’s not unusual for universities to ask their alumni for donations, but the University of Virginia hit its graduates up for a loan – actually 75 of them. 

AP File Photo/Donna McWilliam

Virginia’s State Fair is less than a month away, and organizers are gearing up to host nearly a quarter of a million people at the Meadow Event Park near Richmond.  

In addition to rides, music and agricultural competitions, the fair will offer its usual selection of junk food – corn dogs, funnel cakes, cotton candy and something new.

“This year we have deep fried butter – a hunk of butter with batter, dropped in the deep fryer.”   

That’s the Farm Bureau Federation’s Kathy Dixon.  She says there isn’t much call for healthier fare.

They’re often called, ‘the new old fashioned neighborhoods of the future’ planned communities, where the focus is on collaboration, cooperation and sustainability.  It’s an idea that came from Denmark and it’s beginning to take hold in Virginia. 

“This is sort of the periphery of the building area, the actual building area is a little further in.”

Art Turns Housing into Homes

Aug 25, 2015

Shelter is a big problem for many people in Virginia. Up to 40,000 may be homeless for some period of time during any given year, with many cycling through housing and back to the streets.

Now, a Central Virginia group is using art and interior design to attack the problem.

The Haven day shelter is one block from the popular pedestrian mall in Charlottesville, in a stately, brown-brick church built in 1837. The sign out front reads, “The Haven, everyone needs a place to start.”